The month of Ramadan is the month in which the Quran was sent down,
a guidance for the people, and clear verses of guidance and criterion.
[Quran: Chapter 2:183]

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Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Preparing for Eid al Fitr 2009

Eid al Fitr Preparations

Can you believe that the holy month of Ramadan is almost over?

Muslims around the world are busy preparing for the end of Ramadan, and to begin the Eid al Fitr celebration. Eid al Fitr is only 3-4 days away depending on the region you live in.

Most Muslims around the world will be celebrating Eid al Fitr on September 20, 2009.

Eid Mubarak to all Our Muslims Readers!

Please enjoy the following excerpted article on how Muslims around the world are preparing to celebrate Eid al Fitr.

Eid Around the World


Muslim Children in India Hug on Eid


Saudi Children in New Clothes at Eid Morning Prayers


Eid Celebrations in Luxor, Egypt


Eid Preparations in Malaysia


Shopping for New Clothes


Shopping for Candy in Palestine


Iraq
In Iraq, the family will enjoy a breakfast of buffalo cream with honey and bread before going on to the family lunch together. Here, a lamb may be sacrificed for the occasion, and a special Eid sweetmeat called klaicha, a date-filled pastry, is made.

Egypt
Egypt sees four days of celebration, with preparations starting several days earlier. Special biscuits are made to give to friends and relatives on the day. The men will go to the mosque early in the morning, while the women start work on the preparation of the fish that will form the centrepiece of a great celebratory lunch.

Palestine
Here, in addition to prayers and family celebrations, a special sweetmeat, k'ak al-tamar, is made to serve with coffee.

Somalia
In Somalia, a three-day celebration starts with a family lunch which includes rice mixed with meat and vegetables, and pasta accompanied by anjira (a thin bread prepared liked chapatti). Halva, which in Somalia is more like a cumin-flavoured custard, is also served, along with special fried (or baked) biscuits made of flour, sugar, oil, warm water and baking powder.

Indonesia
In Indonesia, the family lunch consists of dishes made of chicken, lamb or beef, but never fish which is too ubiquitous in Indonesia to be considered as a celebratory dish. The traditional sweet is lapis legit, a rich layered cake. Here, the celebrations will last for a whole month.

Malaysia
In Malaysia, three public holidays mark Eid, but the visiting and celebrations will also continue for a month. Festive dishes include ketupat (rice cooked in wrapped coconut leaves) and lemang (glutinous rice cooked in bamboo cane), served with beef rendang.

Iran
The one exception in all these celebrations is Iran where, although the day is marked as a public holiday, there are no specific dishes made to mark the occasion. This is perhaps because, unlike most Muslim countries, the climate varies widely from season to season, especially on the high Iranian plateau. The winters are very cold and the summers very hot, and the moveable feasts of the lunar calendar preclude the preparation of annual dishes.

Eid Mubarak!

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Special Ramadan Series

Dear Reader, Assalaamu’alaikum.

Ramadan Mubarak. We wish you a blessed and productive Ramadan! Make no mistake about it - keeping the fast and increasing our acts of worship during this blessed month is not an easy task. The physical demands of balancing work or school with fasting all day, feeling fatigued and less effective than you normally are, waking up for Suhoor, praying Teraweeh and Tahajjud prayers, dealing with sleep deficits.

But the last thing we would want is to let Ramadan pass us by without doing all that we aim and desire to. Do not allow yourself to feel guilty or regretful when Ramadan passes.

The Ramadan Series will send you emails with practical tips on how to gain and maintain the physical and spiritual energy necessary to embark on increased religious oligations so that you will reap the benefits from this blessed month. This includes special Ramadan duas to say during the month. Do sign-up today!

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1 Comments:

Blogger krish said...

Awesome! I loved you post! I read HERE about the different Ramzan delicacies. You may too check it out!

September 21, 2009 at 3:35 AM  

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